Button Text
Glossary

Conflict of Objectives

Summary

A goal conflict arises when two or more goals compete with each other and cannot be achieved simultaneously. Recognizing and resolving goal conflicts is one of the important tasks of management, especially in strategic planning and decision-making. Goal conflicts can occur both within individual organizational units and between different actors, and require careful analysis and consideration to find optimal solutions and compromises.

Detailed Content: Goal Conflict

Definition

The term "goal conflict" describes a situation in which at least two goals are pursued simultaneously that interfere with or exclude each other. These can be goals within an organization or between different organizations. Goal conflicts are a common phenomenon in the economic, political, and social spheres and pose a challenge for decision-makers.

Types of Goal Conflicts

Goal conflicts can be divided into different categories. One possible classification distinguishes between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and interorganizational goal conflicts:1. Intrapersonal goal conflicts arise when an individual pursues multiple goals that interfere with each other. An example of this is the desire for a high quality of life while simultaneously wanting professional success, which may involve a high workload.2. Interpersonal goal conflicts occur when two or more individuals pursue different goals that affect each other. An example is when two employees compete for a promotion.3. Interorganizational goal conflicts arise when different organizations or organizational units pursue different goals that interfere with each other. An example of this is the conflict between environmental protection goals and economic interests.

Causes of Goal Conflicts

Goal conflicts can arise for various reasons:

  • Scarcity of resources: When resources such as time, money, or personnel are limited, conflicts can arise between different goals that require these resources.
  • Interdependence of goals: Some goals are dependent on each other and can only be achieved together. In this case, achieving one goal can impede the achievement of another.
  • Incompatibility of goals: In some cases, goals are fundamentally incompatible because they exclude each other. An example is the conflict between environmental protection and economic growth.

Recognizing Goal Conflicts

To identify and manage goal conflicts, it is important to conduct a systematic analysis of the goals and their interactions. Creating a goal landscape can be helpful, where all relevant goals and their relationships are depicted. Goal conflicts can manifest themselves in different dimensions:

  • Temporal dimension: Goal conflicts can concern short-term and long-term goals.
  • Spatial dimension: Goal conflicts can relate to local, regional, or global goals.
  • Subjective dimension: Goal conflicts can be based on individual or collective goals.

Resolving Goal Conflicts

Various strategies are available to resolve goal conflicts:1. Prioritization: This involves deciding which goal is more important and thus takes precedence over others. However, this method can lead to the neglect of less important goals.2. Integration: In this approach, the various goals are linked in such a way that they support each other. This can be done by identifying synergies or developing common solution strategies.3. Compromise: This method attempts to find a balance between different goals by accepting trade-offs in individual goals.4. Sequential processing: Here, the goals are pursued one after the other, with the achievement of one goal being a prerequisite for the achievement of the next.

Conclusion

Goal conflicts are a widespread phenomenon in organizations and in societal contexts. They arise when various goals are pursued simultaneously that interfere with or exclude each other. Recognizing and resolving goal conflicts is a central task of management and strategic planning. Through systematic analysis of the goals and their interactions, goal conflicts can be identified and solution strategies developed. Various approaches are available such as prioritization, integration, compromise, or sequential processing.